Self-Directed Learning and Web-Based English Access to Improve EFL Speaking Skills

Main Article Content

Ranta Butarbutar
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9918-7976

Abstract

For millennial learners, SDL and self-access English study on the web are interesting learning options. Physical space and separation are anticipated since web-based learning may be accessed at any time and from any place. The present study's goal is to find out what kinds of English-language websites students use to improve their speaking skills. Additionally, it is anticipated to look at how learners' perceptions of their speaking skills (cognitive, emotional, and complex) grow as a result of self-directed learning for web-based English access. Due to the improvement in their speaking abilities for SDL and web-based English access, fourth-year undergraduate students in the Indonesian English department were the subjects of the research. The ATLAS.ti application benefits from the thematic analysis of the collected internet data. Three speaking improvement characteristics may be supported by the findings: (1) cognition, fluency, and accuracy outcomes; (2) emotional and motivational outcomes; and (3) learners' problems while using SDL web-based learning. Our study has certain limits, however, and we highly advise participatory action research for future work to assess time management and tailor learning tactics to the level of the learner. The English-language site design will be addressed last.

Article Details

How to Cite
Butarbutar, R. (2023). Self-Directed Learning and Web-Based English Access to Improve EFL Speaking Skills . Asia Proceedings of Social Sciences, 11(1), 10–13. https://doi.org/10.31580/apss.v11i1.2766
Section
8th ASIA International Conference 2022
Author Biography

Ranta Butarbutar, English Language Education Department, Universitas Musamus Merauke, Jalan Kamizaun Mopah Lama, Meraukey, 99611, Indonesia

For millennial learners, SDL and self-access English study on the web are interesting learning options. Physical space and separation are anticipated since web-based learning may be accessed at any time and from any place. The present study's goal is to find out what kinds of English-language websites students use to improve their speaking skills. Additionally, it is anticipated to look at how learners' perceptions of their speaking skills (cognitive, emotional, and complex) grow as a result of self-directed learning for web-based English access. Due to the improvement in their speaking abilities for SDL and web-based English access, fourth-year undergraduate students in the Indonesian English department were the subjects of the research. The ATLAS.ti application benefits from the thematic analysis of the collected internet data. Three speaking improvement characteristics may be supported by the findings: (1) cognition, fluency, and accuracy outcomes; (2) emotional and motivational outcomes; and (3) learners' problems while using SDL web-based learning. Our study has certain limits, however, and we highly advise participatory action research for future work to assess time management and tailor learning tactics to the level of the learner. The English-language site design will be addressed last.